Neurlogical Disorders

Ryan LaCorte Treatments

Bell’s Palsy

Bell’s Palsy is a temporary paralysis of the facial muscles due to limited innervation by the 7th Cranial Nerve (Facial Nerve.)  The exact cause of Bell’s Palsy remains unknown though it is believed to be a result of swelling and inflammation to the Facial Nerve.  Several Viruses have been linked to Bell’s Palsy including Herpes Zoster, Herpes Simplex, Mumps, Epstein-Barr, Influenza B and Coxsackie.  Most cases resolve over a period of weeks with a full recovery in approximately 6 months, however, some cases can cause permanent damage.  Through physical therapy, we attempt to reduce “pulling” of one side of the face.  In severe cases muscle shortening can occur and result in permanent disfigurement.  Additionally, your therapist will teach you facial exercises to attempt to reactivate paralyzed muscles.  Some cases may require Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation to reactivate the muscles of the face.    Your physical therapist will perform a thorough evaluation to assess your condition and devise a treatment plan to best address your symptoms.   All of our facilities are equipped with state of the art modalities and equipment to meet your needs.   Please visit our Toms River, Whiting, Manchester, Brick, Forked River, Freehold, Jackson, or Barnegat facilities and allow us to “give you your life back.”

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease where the body attacks the central nervous system (Brain and Spinal Cord.)  The body’s immune system will attack the sheath that covers the nerve fiber (myelin) thus limiting transmission of information along the nerve pathway.  All patients with MS will present differently, depending upon the level of damage and nerves involved.  Common symptoms can include numbness, tingling or weakness (usually on one side of the body,) vision loss in one eye, prolonged double vision or dizziness.  There are several classifications of MS depending upon presentation.  The most common form is relapsing-remitting.  Patients with relapsing-remitting MS will have periods of exacerbation followed by remission.  While some new symptoms will be permanent, most will resolve over a period of days or weeks.  Approximately 60-70% of patients diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS will eventually develop a steady progression of symptoms know as secondary-progressive MS.  Other patients will present with initial symptoms that will progress over time without relapse.  This is known as Primary Progressive MS.  While the cause of MS remains unknown, it is believed to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors.  Research has indicated MS is twice as common in females as males, and will usually present in individuals 15 to 60 years old.  Symptoms commonly present in females while pregnant or following child birth.  Unfortunately, at this time there is no cure for MS.  Extensive research has however greatly slowed the progression of the disease and reduced incidence of relapse.

Through physical therapy, we will work to isolate the muscle groups involved and devise a treatment plan to regain strength and flexibility.  Your therapist will address any functional difficulties that you encounter and work with you to maximize independence.  Where your symptoms are balance related, weakness, bed mobility or ambulatory difficulties, your therapist will target your challenges and help to return you to your prior level of function. Your physical therapist will perform a thorough evaluation to assess your condition and devise a treatment plan to best address your symptoms.   All of our facilities are equipped with state of the art modalities and equipment to meet your needs.   Please visit our Toms River, Whiting, Manchester, Brick, Forked River, Freehold, Jackson, or Barnegat facilities and allow us to “give you your life back.”

Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA or Stroke)

A Cerebral Vascular Accident (CVA) or Stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is stopped by either a blockage (ischemic stroke) or rupture (hemorrhagic stroke.) During a stroke, portions of the brain are deprived of blood supply resulting in death of brain cells.  It is essential to recognize the signs of a stroke and get treatment fast.  The quicker a stroke is diagnosed and treated, the better the outcomes.  Some common signs of a stroke are difficulty walking, dizziness, difficulty speaking, numbness or paralysis of a leg, arm or face (typically on one side of the body,) or a sudden headache accompanied by nausea or vomiting. Once identified, treatment will be dependent upon the severity and type of stroke.  Ischemic strokes will frequently be treated with a “clot busting” drug.  A hemorrhagic stroke will commonly be treated with medications that lower blood pressure in the brain, or possible surgical intervention to remove excess blood followed by surgery to repair the ruptured blood vessel.

Recovery following a stroke is dependent upon the severity of the injuries as well as structures involved.  The key to successful recovery is early intervention. The greatest gains following a stroke generally occur within the first 6 months to a year making it essential to address any deficits as quickly as possible.  Through Physical Therapy, we will evaluate any residual weakness and functional deficits.  Your therapist will work to help you to regain strength and restore prior levels of function.  With both Occupational and Physical Therapy under one roof, we are equipped to handle all of your stroke rehabilitation needs.   Your physical therapist will perform a thorough evaluation to assess your condition and devise a treatment plan to best address your symptoms.   All of our facilities are equipped with state of the art modalities and equipment to meet your needs.   Please visit our Toms River, Whiting, Manchester, Brick, Forked River, Freehold, Jackson, or Barnegat facilities and allow us to “give you your life back.”

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s Disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that effects the substantia nigra area of the brain.  This area of the brain is responsible for producing dopamine, a chemical within the brain that acts as a messenger between brain cells.  Dopamine plays a key role in initiating movement and speech.  As the production of dopamine is reduced within the substantia nigra, patients will commonly develop tremors, struggle with coordinated motion, develop gait and balance issues and have difficulty with speech volume.  The most common treatment intervention involves the utilization of a dopaminergic medication.  These medications help to replace the dopamine produced by the substantia nigra.  Unfortunately, at this time there is no cure for Parkinson’s Disease, however treatments have come a long way.  Advances in medicine have helped to significantly slow the progression of Parkinson’s Disease symptoms.  Additionally, surgical interventions have proven to be an effective intervention for many patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease.

Through physical therapy, we work to reduce functional deficits incurred through Parkinson’s Disease.  At All-Care Physical Therapy, we implement the LSVT Big Parkinson’s Disease Treatment.  Research has indicated incorporating LSVT Big Exercise Program into a treatment approach can slow disease progression and help to manage current symptoms.  LSVT utilizes large movement patterns common to functional activity to retrain the brain to help perform daily activities.

***For more information, please see the article “LSVT Big: Exaggerated Movements For Parkinson’s Symptom Relief” written by Lindsay Walicky in our publications.

***For more information on LSVT, please see our specialized treatment section.

Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy refers to injury or damage to the peripheral nerves that bring information to and from the brain.  While there are many mechanisms for peripheral neuropathy including trauma, metabolic issues and vascular deficiency, the most common is circulatory deficits frequently seen in Diabetic patients (Diabetic Neuropathy.) It is important to recognize that peripheral neuropathy and circulatory deficits can occur in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients.  Symptoms consist primarily of numbness and pain predominantly in the hands and feet, however symptoms can be experienced throughout the body.  In some cases muscle weakness will also be present.  Due to the lack sensation and weakness, can have a significant impact on balance.  Unfortunately, most types are not curable.  Most treatments involve the use of medications designed to manage the discomfort.  However, there is hope to improving you balance.

As stated earlier, receptors are found throughout the body, constantly giving information to the brain on pressures and positioning.  When the nerves in the lower leg are no longer functioning, we can train the body to utilize the receptors in other joints to interpret our positioning.  If the bottom of the foot is no longer transmitting information, we will train the receptors found within the feet, ankles and knees to interpret positioning.  Your physical therapist will assess your balance deficits and design activities to stimulate the receptors within the joints to better interpret positioning.  In doing so, your body will learn ways to control positioning based upon this information.  Additionally, the increase in activity will help with circulation and reduce further progression of neuropathy. Your physical therapist will perform a thorough evaluation to assess your condition and devise a treatment plan to best address your symptoms.   All of our facilities are equipped with state of the art modalities and equipment to meet your needs.   Please visit our Toms River, Whiting, Manchester, Brick, Forked River, Freehold, Jackson, or Barnegat facilities and allow us to “give you your life back.”

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